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The New Year • The Next King • Cops: Texas

Paul Lojeski: The great stone hall of history, silent and indifferent, has seen it all before: the gathering of oppression, excited and frenzied to bloody flesh and bone, thundering across the landscape like a pack of starving wolves.
Next King

The New Year

The great stone hall of history,
silent and indifferent,
has seen it all before:

the gathering of oppression,
excited and frenzied to bloody
flesh and bone, thundering

across the landscape like
a pack of starving wolves.
A new Franco rising in

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the shadows of freedom,
a joke become nightmare,
a psychosis let loose upon

the future. Once more,
then, battle lines are drawn
in the long winter of its reign.

The Next King

Good times bring the bad
and the bad the good,
so it seems. Or maybe
times are neither good
nor bad, they’re just,
a continuously flowing
river carrying us from
here to there. To wherever.
But natural intent is never
enough, for some
men, rule and power
drive the heart to force
the river to bend to their
whims, no matter the result
of floods or destruction.
One of those now steps
upon the throne, steps
upon the river’s path
to shape its direction
to his will, no matter
the cost or damage
done, no matter the cries
of the drowning.

Cops: Texas

Like all police reality
shows it showcases cops
in high speed chases down
dark alleys, on footraces
through lousy backyards
until tackling or trapping
the poor: poor whites, poor
blacks, poor Indians, poor
of everything, usually drunk
or stoned, slurring words,
barely able to stand, mostly
out on parole, without
a license or work,
railing at a girl/boyfriend,
neighbor or unknown, invisible
enemy. The police in their
starched violence talk them
down, cuff them, put them
in the cars, maintaining
the fist of order, the wounds
of control, keeping the poor
poor, in jail or dying alone
somewhere cold, so the limos
can glide smoothly upon this
beaten earth without fear
of retribution, free of the rope
or bullets of revenge,
unlike the Czars who paid
with their necks, back when
justice came roaring.

Paul Lojeski